Vancouver BC – Portland, Oregon Food Scene

March 9th, 2016

One of my favorite thing about editorial photography is the opportunity to visit new places. This past December I had the opportunity to do an editorial assignment photographing the food scene in Vancouver B.C. for Via Magazine. Here are a few samples:

Spiced Carrot Smorreboard with Fresh Cheese, apple and Buckwheat, at Farmer's Apprentice
Spiced Carrot Smorreboard with Fresh Cheese, apple and Buckwheat, at Farmer’s Apprentice

 

Beef and Guinness Pie at Dock Lunch
Beef and Guinness Pie at Dock Lunch

 

Diners enjoying dinner service at Bao Bei Chinese Brassierie in Vancouver BC
Diners enjoying dinner service at Bao Bei Chinese Brassierie in Vancouver BC

 

Assorted macaroons at Bon Macaron Patisserie in Vancouver BC
Assorted macaroons at Bon Macaron Patisserie in Vancouver BC

 

Meanwhile, back home, right here in my own neighborhood in Portland I photographed at Portland Monthly’s Restaurant of the Year, Coquine.

 

Roasted and raw carrots with peppery mustard greens, caper berries, a sieved duck egg and rosemary breadcrumbs. IN the background is Roasted sun chokes with sugarloaf chicory, pear walnut butter and cognac vinaigrette., photographed at Coquine in Portland.
Roasted and raw carrots with peppery mustard greens, caper berries, a sieved duck egg and rosemary breadcrumbs. In the background is Roasted sun chokes with sugarloaf chicory, pear walnut butter and cognac vinaigrette, photographed at Coquine in Portland.

 

Of course one of the great perks of being a food photographer for editorial assignments, is often once done, you get to eat! Another reason I’m trying to drop some pounds now. (sadface)

Video / Motion

February 16th, 2016

While my career remains focused on still photography, I am often asked whether I shoot video, and the answer is, yes. I’ve done a variety of commissioned and personal motion projects and I’ve added a link to my Vimeo page which can be accessed via my revised “Contact / Links” page.

Robbie McClaran Motion Projects: https://vimeo.com/robbiemcclaran

Here’s one of my favorites.

Mardi Gras 1979 in New Orleans – Exhibit Announcement

November 30th, 2015

Way back in 1979 when I was fresh out of the Visual Studies Workshop and an aspiring young editorial photographer, I moved to New Orleans and lived for a brief time.

Within a few days of arriving I found a slave quarters apartment in the French Quarter and began spending most waking hours photographing on the streets.

By a quirk of history, that same year the New Orleans Police Department staged a strike during Mardi Gras and most of the public events were cancelled. Many tourists stayed home, yet to this day some locals recall it as one the best Mardi Gras ever.

This was also a time before the arrival of AIDS, and the final days of the sexual revolution. Public nudity and sexual display were pervasive and revelers eagerly performed for my camera.

Initially I was hesitant to show the photographs publicly because of their overt sexuality. After more than thirty five years in storage, I am incredibly excited to announce Arthur Severio of Fee and Arts, with help from Jen Shaw has invited me to exhibit a selection of the pictures during PhotoNOLA. The show opens later this week and I will be in town on Saturday December 12 for a gallery talk. Please stop by Fee and Arts if you happen to be in town.

 

Card-cover-RGBrevised

 

MardisGras-layout-Card-v3-2

Upcoming Workshops

May 26th, 2015

I’m pleased to announce I’ll be offering two workshops this coming September at Newspace Center For Photography.  On Thursdays, beginning September 3 and running through September 24 I’ll be teaching Lighting I: Studio Overview. This is a foundational class that introduces concepts of working with studio lighting techniques and equipment.

On Tuesdays, beginning on September 8 and running through September 29, I’ll be teaching Introduction to Visual Storytelling. This is also a foundational class that will introduce the potential and power for storytelling with images, a brief overview of documentary / photojournalism • conceptual / lyrical storytelling •identifying story ideas • tools, methods and techniques • outlets for presenting your work (books, exhibits, online, multi-media, apps). For registration information, please click on the links below.

http://newspacephoto.org/class/lighting-i-studio-overview-2/

http://newspacephoto.org/class/intro-to-visual-storytelling/

 

April 19th

April 20th, 2015

Yesterday was April 19th and marked the 20th anniversary of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City where 168 people, including 19 children were killed. A year after the bombing on the eve of my appointment to photograph Timothy McVeigh, who was later convicted of the crime, I visited the site and made these following photographs.

1996-okcity-1

 The ruins of the building had been mostly removed. Memorials in the form of wooden crosses, made from splintered fragments left by the bombing, dotted the fence surrounding the site.

1996-okcity-2

 

1996-okcity4

 

Across the street from where the front of the Murrah Building once stood, the ruins of another building destroyed by McVeigh’s bomb still stood.

1996-okcity3

 

It was said McVeigh was motivated by the events that took place two years earlier,  also on April 19th, in 1993, when federal troops stormed the Branch Davidian compound where followers of David Koresh had been under siege by the FBI since February of that year. On that awful day 76 people were killed, including Koresh.

I also visited that site, trying to make some sense of what happened. The scenes were no less appalling than what I had seen in Oklahoma City.

1996-mtcarmel3

 

1996-mtcarmel-4

 

1996-mtcarmel-2tif

 

1996-mtcarmel-1

 

Walking through this place and over the rubble of where only a few years earlier hundreds had lived and worshiped was a powerful experience. I left with no better understanding of how something like that can happen in a supposed civil society.

The day I photographed McVeigh left me even more baffled and saddened. I found him to be intelligent and upbeat and he seemed utterly remorseless. I’ve long been an opponent of the death penalty, but I shed no tears from Timothy McVeigh when he was executed in 2001.

1996-mcvey-bw1.2

 

These events twenty and more years ago share striking and frightening parallels to events happening today. Heavily armed anti-government militias continue to attract more followers, as evidenced by the standoff in Nevada between supporters of rancher Cliven Bundy, and BLM officials and police just last year.

Meanwhile police continue to kill unarmed citizens at a terrifying rate, and quell protesters with military grade weaponry.

And each year I hold my breath on April 19th, praying something terrible won’t happen again.